Tag: need to be right

People Who Need to Be Right – A Collaborative Column

Dearest Readers,

This is a very powerful column as each one of us delves into a different perspective. As you might notice there is a running theme throughout… Self-Worth. I hope you find inspiration in what you read!

Much Love, KB

kristen-bio  KRISTEN BROWN

Chances are you’ve come across this article because someone in your life is driving you mad with his/her need to be right. It’s likely they are ridiculously aggravating to be around and you might even be considering relinquishing the relationship.

Before you make a rash decision, let’s take a deeper look into what may be going on behind the scenes.

My personal healing path combined with decades of research and close contact with the public has taught me a few things about people who stubbornly have to be right:

  1. They feel powerless in their life and often become stubborn as a means to feel like they are in control. They are often individuals who give away their power easily.
  2. They have a deep belief of unworthiness or inadequacy based on words spoken over them or life circumstance. Unfortunately, these people “right fight” in order to show others what they feel has been overlooked – their value as a brilliant and equivalent contributor.
  3. Their “right fighting” is a raw and real plea to be seen and heard – to matter to someone. It is a cry for love and acceptance.

Most of us know we cannot change others. However, our “difficult” relationships offer us a magnificent growth point for ourselves!

Other’s annoying behavior is often a clever design of the Universe to help us uncover the shadow (unhealed wounds) we need to work on.

The times we are judging the most are the times we actually need to look closer within to learn where we might possess the same trait. It’s called projection.

So the question then becomes…

Do I have a need to be right?

At first glance, you might be unwilling to see where “right fighting” is true in yourself, because self-responsibility begins the fragmentation (or death) of the ego and the ego will do whatever it takes to preserve itself!

However, the good news is…

Self-evolution begins when we are ready and willing to look within and heal all that may be standing between righteousness and happiness.

People on high evolutionary paths are willing to be wrong and willing to choose their battles.

So with this new perspective, I’d like you to circle back to the list above and humbly ask yourself, “Is this me?”

And here’s where it gets really good!

Once we heal in ourselves what we are judging most in others, we naturally stop being aggravated and annoyed by them. Our new healed position replaces annoyance with compassion because we begin to understand their behavior on a much deeper level.

Their “right fighting” might still be present, but our experience will shift from judgment to observation which will give us opportunity to respond to them in a much higher way.

So the next time you find yourself or another person battling to be right, ask yourself this:

Is it vitally important to my health and well-being to be right or can I sit this one out?

Kristen Brown is the founder and Page Admin of Sweet Empowerment. Kristen learned (the hard way) to heal her unworthiness in order to step into a life of peace and empowerment. She is on fire to heal your wounds and step into your best life. Contact Kristen HERE to begin your journey to empowerment today.

20160617_131442-1_resized  LISA MARQUIS

If you’ve ever seen Dr Phil, you’ve probably heard the term “right fighter.” A right fighter is defined as someone who is more concerned about being right in a conflict or situation than they are about resolution that’s best for all. They have to be right, period. There is no compromise.

We all know right fighters. Some are more stubborn about their “rightness” than others, and will argue the most innocuous points! Their need to be right can be so uncomfortable that we feel the need to feign agreement, slink away, or play small to avoid confrontation. While this might keep the peace, it leaves us feeling not so good about them or the situation.

This issue is very personal to me. I grew up with a family of right fighters, and the need to be right was modeled to me all my life. It was normal to me. I knew what I knew and you weren’t going to tell me any differently. Being the youngest fueled this dynamic, as everyone else came before me, they knew it all, and I was determined to show them differently.

In my search for personal empowerment and peace, I’ve learned that for me, the need to be right comes from feeling unworthy inside.

If I’m right I feel worthy, validated, intelligent, accepted, so therefore I need to be right! I need that validation. If I’m right then I can’t be wrong, right? Yeah, right!

You’ve probably heard the phrase “would you rather be right or be happy?” Great question. Does it really matter if everyone thinks I’m right? And what if I’m wrong? Shouldn’t I just be happy?

I’ve been humbled time and again, having discovered a conversation or argument where I wasn’t right about something I was so certain about! At some point the truth dawned on me or somehow I found out that I erred in my thought process. Still, that didn’t change my need to be right. My auto pilot of “rightness” was alive and well.

In recovery programs like AA, it is said:

“What you live with you learn, what you learn you practice, what you practice you become.”

This was so true for me, and I brought this behavior of needing to be right well into adulthood. I projected my own insecurities and feelings of low self-worth onto others, and oftentimes it manifested itself as the need to be right.

I’m still working on this and my feelings of unworthiness and inadequacy. It’s not an easy task after so many years of letting my ego run the show.

When I find myself in that “need to be right” space, I try to stop and consider the situation. Is it really necessary to force my opinion on others? Can I let it go? I pause, think, agree to disagree if need be and learn from the situation.

What I’ve learned is, being right isn’t as important as being peaceful or happy.

Lisa Marquis is a Hair Stylist, Truth Seeker and aspiring Author! If you would like to follow Lisa on her Facebook biz page, click here: Straight Up Hair

Sue BIO  SUE MARKOVITCH

It’s election year. As someone who spends time on social media for business and pleasure, I see a lot of political discussions going on. What comes to light is some people desperately need to be right.

My older brother was here from Texas last week. I hadn’t seen him in four years, but we are connected on Facebook. He has lots of political opinions, so I was a little nervous when we got into a deep conversation about the world, faith and justice. What I found, though, was an extremely respectful conversation. He asked me about my views, then listened. He didn’t interrupt me. He didn’t call me an idiot or raise his voice. He didn’t try to make me feel wrong. In his love for me, he was authentically seeking to understand my views.

It was fucking awesome!

I felt heard and loved and validated, even though we do not share specific faiths, or candidates. I believe he felt the same way.

Not all conversations go that way. Things escalate as one response leads to another response and no one actually hears anyone. I’ve come to believe a few things about people who need to be right.

  1. Be Willing To Hear

People who need to be right are actually people who desperately long to be heard. Am I willing to show up in love and just hear them? Does the conversation have to be a debate, or can I, with authentic curiosity, seek to know this person and why they hold the beliefs that they do? I am learning to do that, knowing that I have people who can then hold space for me and hear me, without debate.

  1. Healthy Boundaries

Sometimes, we need healthy boundaries to keep from being pulled down into the lower vibe conversation of who is right and who is wrong. I am always willing to tell my story, but my faith is not up for debate. I can’t prove to you that God exists or that one candidate or party will lead better than another. So sometimes I choose to bow out, or change the subject. I’d much rather talk about eighties music anyway!

  1. Damn You, Projection

The most important thing to remember, when I start thinking about this person or that person needing to be right, is owning that projection. Meaning, if I see the need to be right in another, to the extent I am judging and pointing it out, I’d better quickly own that I have a need to be right. If I didn’t, it would not be a hot button of judgment for me. They are the trigger. The issue is in me.

Once I own my need to be right, I can begin to heal. I am empowered to see things differently. I no longer engage in debate, as much as radical love for my fellow brothers and sisters. I can listen with the intent to simply understand. I can be with a different point of view and stay rooted in love. I can put my relationships above my need to be right and feel heard, and make the miraculous shift from fear to love. In doing so, I become an empowerment warrior in the healing of this broken, hurting world.

Sue Markovitch is an empowerment warrior and writer in Columbus, Ohio. Her book, I Know What to Do, I Just Don’t Do It is available on Amazon. She works with women over 40 to reclaim their personal power to live a life of integrity. Sign up for her weekly newsletter at www.clearrockfitness.com.

KelliHeadshot  KELLI DAVIES

We’ve all encountered that person who’s done everything and knows everything. They might even ask you a question and then argue with you about the answer! Dealing with people who always need to be right is exhausting and frustrating.

In this current age of social media access, now more than ever, people feel the need to express, post, and tweet their views/opinions about any and everything. Inevitably, someone with the opposite viewpoint is going to comment, and before you can blink, it’s turned into a full blown social media brawl.

Why would anyone spend so much time and energy arguing with people on social media?

Because they need to be right. They’ve taken such a rigid stance on what they feel to be true, they lack being open to seeing things from another perspective.

When dealing with these situations, ask yourself questions, questions, and more questions!

How important is this issue in the grand scheme of things?

Do I really want to engage in this debate?

Are they open to understanding my perspective?

Do I need to be understood or am I trying to win?

What is it going to cost me to be right?

Usually, I only have these conversations with people that I know to be open minded and rational. If you know from past experience that the person you’re dealing with lacks the ability to be open to truly hear you, then you must decide if it’s worth the energy to engage. 

Sometimes you have to communicate to the person what you need from them. You might have to say, “I need for you to put yourself in my shoes and understand where I’m coming from”. It might be an obvious thing to do in your eyes, but not everyone thinks that way.

When you lack the ability to see things from another person’s perspective, not only do you alienate those around you, but there is also a lack of the ability to be compassionate. We could all spend more time seeking to understand things that we oppose/disagree with or don’t have knowledge about, and less time convincing people why we’re right.

I believe that having this mindset will create peace and harmony in your relationships.

Kelli Davies has spent over 20yrs working as an aesthetician/makeup artist whose current work home is Prova Salon in Scottsdale, Az. Kelli is a church-going, intuitive, spiritual gangster!  Kelli’s spiritual journey has invoked a deep passion in her to encourage and speak life into others. 

Stubbornness Is False Empowerment

I used to observe the stubborn people around me and wonder why on earth they felt the need to take a stand over something so minute or something that clearly wasn’t going to serve anyone’s highest good. I observed it. I studied it. I went within. I took it to God. Then I realized that stubbornness is often born to those who feel powerless in life. Somewhere along the line they learned that the only way to be heard, to get what they wanted or to matter was to burrow in so deep they were unmovable. To the stubborn one this may (for a moment) feel like strength; however, soon thereafter a piece of them will feel silly for their narrow views and bratty behavior and regret will follow.

We simply do not have to act like petulant children to get what we want out of life. Stubbornness to achieve a well-placed, well-intended goal is great. Stubbornness born out of a need to feel powerful is not. It causes disruption, disharmony and lack of connection. It separates one from another. Believe it or not, it makes “your” vision more important than another’s vision. And if we are really honest with ourselves, when our stubborn stance is challenged by others’ opinions, we may start to see a better way but feel too embarrassed to retract our stand because we’ve made such a fuss. Now we are stuck with the previous choice and the regret that will inevitably follow. The stubborn one has no idea that his cry for empowerment has trumped his true power and all he has successfully proven is how ridiculous he can be.

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How To Release Stubbornness

When we do the work to heal our lack of worthiness (yes, that sneaky devil is behind this) we stop feeling the need to dig in. We become open to options and opinions and actually welcome input from others because worthiness understands we can’t know it all and there may be some great information out there worth listening to. The empowered understands that “personal power” comes from knowledge and wisdom and taking all external information and processing it effectively to make the best choice. There is peace in this process where as stubbornness feels prickly and uncomfortable for all involved.

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Worthiness doesn’t allow us to backdoor our way to power. It naturally exudes strength through active listening, research and exploring options. When we feel and know our worth, we let go of our disjointed behaviors that may be causing disruption where there really needn’t be any and replace them with solid, educated decisions.

I understand that sometimes there is a necessity to hold firm in front of certain people and any sign of perceived “weakness” may be exploited to the point that your opinion goes unnoticed. However, isn’t it better to gather information prior to making your final decision rather than having to backtrack later after you’ve made such a fuss? The latter only proves further that the stance you’ve so vehemently took was for naught. With that, we teach others that our stance is weak and eventually we will be proven ineffective. Our stubbornness eventually becomes a joke to those around us and they eventually lose faith in our decision making capabilities.  In the end, we will get exactly what we were trying to avoid.

Empowerment is allowing yourself time to discover ALL options.

Empowerment means being open to a change of heart.

Empowerment is the giving of kudos to another when they’ve enlightened you to a better way.

Empowerment is taking time to decide your position prior to digging your heels in.

Empowerment is exuding your personal power naturally without bullying tactics or hard lines.

Empowerment is gentle but firm.

Is it time for you to let your stubborn nature go? A change in perception can change your direction right here, right now. The choice is yours.

Your thoughts?